Diet To Prevent Anemia And Improve Hemoglobin

  • 12 months ago
4 minute read.
Diet To Prevent Anemia And Improve Hemoglobin

Feeling exhausted, weak, and constantly out of breath? You may be experiencing symptoms of anemia, a condition caused by a deficiency of healthy red blood cells or hemoglobin in the body.


Anemia is a common condition characterized by a deficiency of healthy red blood cells or hemoglobin in the body. It can lead to fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and other complications. While medical intervention may be necessary for severe cases, adopting a well-balanced diet can play a crucial role in preventing anemia and improving hemoglobin levels.



What is a low hemoglobin count?

Hemoglobin is a protein present in red blood cells that plays a vital role in transporting oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carrying carbon dioxide back to the lungs for elimination. When the hemoglobin levels fall below certain thresholds, it is considered a low hemoglobin count.

In men, a low hemoglobin count is generally defined as anything below 13.5 grams per deciliter, while in women, it is considered low if it falls below 12 grams per deciliter. Several factors can contribute to low hemoglobin levels, including:

  1. Iron deficiency anemia: It is one of the most common causes of low hemoglobin. Insufficient iron intake or absorption can lead to a decreased production of hemoglobin, resulting in anemia.
  2. Pregnancy: During pregnancy, the body requires increased amount of blood to support the growing fetus. If the body fails to produce an adequate number of red blood cells to meet this demand, it can result in low hemoglobin levels.
  3. Liver problems: Liver diseases such as cirrhosis or hepatitis can affect the production of red blood cells and lead to low hemoglobin counts.
  4. Urinary tract infections (UTIs): In some cases, chronic UTIs can contribute to low hemoglobin levels, although the exact mechanism is not fully understood.

Also check: How to manage low hemoglobin levels?


Book a full body test, including Complete Blood Count Test with ESR (CBC), on The Wellness Corner.


What happens when your hemoglobin is low?

A decrease in hemoglobin levels can impede the delivery of sufficient oxygen to body organs, leading to symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, headaches, shortness of breath, rapid heart rate, and pale skin. This condition, characterized by reduced hemoglobin levels in the blood, is known as anemia.

Taking adequate measures to improve hemoglobin levels is crucial. Your diet plays a crucial role in hemoglobin synthesis and maintaining optimal levels.

How to increase hemoglobin?

Iron-rich foods

Iron is an essential mineral that forms a key component of hemoglobin, which carries oxygen throughout the body. Including iron-rich foods in your diet can significantly contribute to preventing anemia and boosting hemoglobin levels. Opt for lean meats like beef, poultry, and seafood, provide highly bioavailable heme iron.

Plant-based sources such as legumes (beans, lentils, chickpeas), tofu, spinach, and fortified cereals are excellent alternatives for vegetarians and vegans. Pairing these foods with vitamin C-rich sources like citrus fruits, berries, and bell peppers enhances iron absorption.

Also check: Recipes to fight anemia

Folate-rich foods

Folate, or vitamin B9, is essential for the production of red blood cells. A folate deficiency can lead to megaloblastic anemia, characterized by abnormally large red blood cells. To boost your folate levels, consume dark leafy greens like spinach, kale, and collard greens. Legumes, such as lentils and chickpeas, as well as asparagus, broccoli, and citrus fruits, are also excellent sources of this essential nutrient.

Diet Plan

Vitamin B12 sources

Vitamin B12 is vital for the production of healthy red blood cells. Its deficiency can lead to pernicious anemia, a type of anemia caused by the inability to absorb enough vitamin B12. Incorporate animal products such as fish, shellfish, meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy into your diet to ensure an adequate intake of this crucial vitamin. For individuals following a plant-based diet, fortified cereals, nutritional yeast, and plant-based milk alternatives can be good sources of vitamin B12.

Including copper and zinc

Copper and zinc are trace minerals that play important roles in red blood cell production and hemoglobin synthesis. Incorporate foods like oysters, shellfish, legumes, nuts, and seeds to ensure an adequate intake of copper and zinc.

Diet plan to increase hemoglobin

MEAL

MENU

QUANTITY

EARLY MORNING

LUKEWARM LEMON WATER (UNSWEETENED)

+ RAISINS

+ ALMONDS

1 GLASS

8-10 NO.

4 NO.

BREAKFAST

POHA/ VEGETABLE OMELET/ CARROT-SPINACH PARANTHA

+ COW’S MILK/ CURD

+ POMEGRANATE

1 BOWL / 1 NO.

1 GLASS/ 1 CUP

1 WHOLE

MID-MORNING SNACK

MIXED SPROUTS/ CHANA-SOYA TIKKI

+ MINT CHUTNEY

1 BOWL/ 2 NO.

1 TSP

LUNCH

VEGETABLE SALAD (WITH LEMON DRESSING)

+ DAL WITH GREEN LEAFY VEGETABLE

+ SAUTEED SEASONAL VEGETABLE

+ CURD / VEGETABLE RAITA

+ ROTI

1 BOWL

1 BOWL

1 BOWL

1 BOWL

2-3 NO.

MID-EVENING SNACK

CHAMOMILE TEA/ MINT-BEETROOT JUICE

+ ROASTED FOX NUTS / RAGI CRISPS

1 CUP/ 1 GLASS

HANDFUL

DINNER

MIXED VEGETABLE SOUP

+ DAL/ KADHI/ SAMBHAR

+ SEASONAL VEGETABLE

+ ROTI/ RAGI IDLI / BROWN RICE

+ JAGGERY

1 BOWL

1 BOWL

1 BOWL

2 NO./ 1 BOWL

1-INCH PC.

POST DINNER

MILK WITH DATES

1 GLASS 

Conclusion

Maintaining a well-balanced diet is crucial for preventing anemia and improving hemoglobin levels. By incorporating iron-rich foods, sources of vitamin B12, folate, vitamin C, and ensuring an adequate protein intake, you can support your body's ability to produce healthy red blood cells and maintain optimal hemoglobin levels.

Remember to consult a healthcare professional or a dietitian for personalized advice tailored to your specific nutritional needs. With a nutritious diet as your ally, you can promote overall health and vitality while preventing anemia.

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