Why Does Criticism Make People Feel Low? Ways to Deal With Criticism at Work Effectively

  • 9 days ago
5 minute read.
Why Does Criticism Make People Feel Low? Ways to Deal With Criticism at Work Effectively


In today’s work environment, criticism has become an unavoidable part of everyday business, and it’s not always easy to deal with. How do you go about managing criticism effectively?

Criticism can be damaging in the workplace, particularly if you’re sensitive to it or you feel like it’s being pointed at you specifically. Suppose you want to learn how to handle criticism effectively. In that case, you need to understand why criticism makes people feel low and how they can deal with this effectively to move forward professionally.

You can try to ignore it and pretend that you don’t notice the critical attitude of your boss or coworkers, or you can respond openly to the criticism to reduce the impact it has on your productivity and self-esteem. But how do you know which approach works best?

We’ll cover all of this and more in today’s post on why criticism makes people feel low? And how do you deal with criticism at work?

Why do people feel crushed by criticism?

Because workplace emotions are complicated and people aren’t machines. To start with, workplace criticism—and any feedback, can send a signal that you’re not quite up to snuff; it can be difficult for employees to keep their chins up and maintain confidence.

On top of that, many people have an overly idealistic view of how they perceive themselves.

In other words, we often think we’re better than we actually are. This is known as self-enhancement bias, and it means people will often react more strongly to negative feedback than positive ones (which makes sense from an evolutionary perspective).

When a colleague or boss tells you something you didn’t know about yourself—or doesn’t like about your performance—it can feel pretty devastating.

Reasons why criticism can be a good thing?

This is where effective feedback comes in—if it’s delivered effectively. Positive criticism can spur your employees on, and negative criticism can encourage them to be more self-aware and keep improving their work. And if you work hard enough, you could even turn a critique into an opportunity for growth! Since constructive feedback comes from a good place, it shouldn’t make you feel bad about yourself.

Ways to deal effectively with the criticism and the critics

#1. It’s about how you deal with it:

It’s easy to let criticism get you down, but it can be positive if you can turn it into a learning experience. Keep in mind that constructive feedback is never personal—it’s just information that will help you improve your work and become more successful. So please take what you can from each critique, and try not to take it personally.

If someone has gone out of their way to give you feedback on something they think could make your work better, don’t waste their time by being defensive or making excuses for yourself; instead, use their advice as an opportunity for growth!

#2. It’s not about you:

It can be hard to take criticism but remember that it’s never personal—it’s just feedback on your work, and it has nothing to do with who you are. So if someone points out something they don’t like about your work, try not to take it personally; instead, use their feedback as an opportunity for growth!

#3. Be grateful:

If you know someone is giving you constructive feedback because they want to help you succeed, say thank you—even if it’s difficult to hear what they have to say. This will show them that you appreciate their time and effort, which could lead them to give more helpful critiques in the future.

Related: Why gratitude is a must for a productive day?

#4. Don’t take it personally:

Remember that constructive criticism isn’t personal; it’s just information on how you can improve your work! So don’t let a critique get you down; instead, try to learn from each critique to become a better employee or business owner.


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#5. Turn criticism into an opportunity for growth:

Instead of letting criticism make you feel bad about yourself, turn it into an opportunity for growth! If someone points out something they don’t like about your work, try not to take it personally; instead, use their feedback as an opportunity for growth!

Also check: Workplace anxiety and ways to deal with it

#6. Ask questions:

If you don’t understand what someone means when they give you constructive feedback on your work, ask them questions—but only if they seem open to answering. This will help you better understand what they were trying to say and how their advice can help improve your work in the future.

#7. Listen without judgment:

It can be hard not to take criticism personally, but remember that it isn’t about you; it’s just about your work! So try not to get defensive or make excuses for yourself; instead, listen carefully to what someone has said and use it as an opportunity for growth!

#8. Remember why they’re giving you feedback:

If someone gives you constructive feedback on your work, keep in mind that they’re doing so because they want to help you succeed—and sometimes, people give better advice when they don’t have a personal stake in things. So if someone offers their opinion about something you’ve done, say thank you; even if it isn’t what you wanted to hear, it can still be helpful!

#9. Keep an open mind:

It can be hard not to take criticism personally, but remember that it isn’t about you; it’s just about your work! So try not to get defensive or make excuses for yourself; instead, listen carefully to what someone has said and use it as an opportunity for growth!

#10. Try something new:

If someone gives you constructive feedback on your work, try incorporating their advice into future projects—but only if it makes sense and applies to what you do.

Conclusion

  • When you receive feedback, don’t take it personally.
  • Look beyond your emotions, and focus on seeing ways in which you can improve your performance next time. By focusing on improvement rather than defending yourself against false claims, you’ll be able to make real progress in your professional life.
  • If a coworker or boss is giving you feedback that makes you feel low, remember that they aren’t attacking you as a person; they want to help you succeed. And if a colleague criticizes one of your ideas, remember that criticism is an opportunity for growth—not an attack on who you are as a person.
  • The best way to deal with criticism is by accepting it and learning from it instead of getting defensive or upset about it.

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